Trail Etiquette

Most of the trails in Carlisle are unimproved, earthen pathways. Many pass near or cross our abundant wetlands and are very vulnerable to abuse, and erosion, particularly during wet periods. Several also cross private land, either with easements or by individual permission of the landowner. To preserve this fragile resource, please observe the following rules and guidelines:

  • Stay on marked trails; this is especially important when crossing private land.
  • Do not use motorized vehicles on any trails (except for the trails on Foss Farm).
  • Avoid using wet sections of the trails. Rutting and erosion spoil everyone's enjoyment of the land. Horseback riders and all-terrain bicyclists should be especially careful.
  • In spring and summer, walk around the perimeter of hayfields and cornfields to avoid damaging the crops.
  • Respect the privacy of landowners who have generously allowed the public to cross their land.
  • Clean up after your animals by bagging feces or kicking manure off the paths.
  • Keep dogs on a leash or under control.
  • Remove your own trash, and make yourself feel good by picking up after those less considerate.
  • Give horses the right of way and do not make sudden movements that could frighten them.
  • During skiing season, respect ski tracks by not walking or riding horses in them.
  • If you are the first skier (hiker) though after a snowfall, please keep to one side of the trail to leave space for the first hiker (skier) to come through on the other side of the trail.
  • Resist the temptation to pick wildflowers. Leave them for everyone to enjoy. All vegetation along trails in wetlands is subject to the Wetlands Protection Act and Carlisle Wetland Bylaw.
  • Participate in clean-up days scheduled by the Trails Committee or other conservation groups.
  • Consider adopting and maintaining a trail in your neighborhood. 

In short, enjoy this resource and use common sense.

Note: Rules and Regulations for the use of Conservation lands in Carlisle are available from the Conservation Commission. All trail users should be familiar with them. Enjoy!